About your Search

20130318
20130326
STATION
CSPAN 4
CSPAN2 4
CNBC 2
CNNW 2
MSNBCW 1
LANGUAGE
English 22
Search Results 0 to 21 of about 22 (some duplicates have been removed)
. chairman, i thank you for your kind words this is about the men and women of the fbi accomplished so much in the last decade. i thank you for the opportunity to be here to represent the men and women of the fbi. i also want to start by thanking this committee and result in particular for the extraordinary support you have given to the fbi over the last decade. we live in a time of diverse and persistent threats from terrorists, spies, cyber criminals. at the same time, we face a wide range of criminal corruption. just as our national security and criminal threats constantly evolves, so too must the fbi to meet encounter these evolving threats. we look forward to one additional challenge, this the ability to maintain our current capabilities to these threats during a time of constrained budgets. today, i spent a moment to connect our highest priority, national security and criminal threats. terrorists ruined our top priority, terrace with global reach and global ambitions that seek to strike as at home and abroad. the opera today in more places and against a wider array of targets than the
and what not to present. >> the fbi have been all over him like a rash yet the immigration judge doesn't know this? who dropped the ball? >> good question. we don't know. >> this is the 2002 court documents in which the judge granted chahazeh asylum saying he remained to a group that were hopelessly in debt. >> he helped him fill out the application. it's in her handwriting. >> it was unusual for a federal judge to grant asylum based on a group called hopeless debtors. >> he wshe was a superior court judge for 8 years and a senior analyst for fox news. >> the federal judge concluded he would be tortured or killed when if he went back there. >> in 2007 fbi claims he is a danger to national security. >> he was connected to the hijackers. >> in 2007 the board of appeals reopened chehazeh's case. he had high powered attorneys. >> not only did they assist him he has attorneys working for him free. >> despite numerous requests by fox files for an interview of written statements neither chehazeh or his attorneys would speak to us. in a ruling the day before valentine's day 2013 the board of i
is personal. for former criminal investigator jim bush and retired fbi special agent bob buchowski. >> 3,000 people were murdered. he was definitely part of that conspiracy. >> from the beginning wouldn't really give up anything. nothing about him fit. we knew that. we knew in our gut that there is something wrong. >> he arrived in the united states in july of 2000 from sud rabe. >> settled into the middle eastern community of patterson. >> paterson, new jersey, where 11 of the 19 hijackers passed through before the 9/11 attacks. >> paterson is really the launching pad for the plot. >> it is the only place we can actually connect. we can't put them all together at one time or in one meeting place because they blended in the community. >> it is here that he met up and lived with another key facilitator of the hijackers a jordannian who remains a secret of 9/11 as fox news first reported two years ago. he ran illegal driver's license schemes in new jersey, connecticut and virginia and had apartments in all three states. >> he was part of the criminal network in patterson. >> chiaza had no
the communities -- the communities also would. in terms of training, we have had this discussion about fbi staff training. the train was utilizing stereotypic erroneous information. we brought that to you, and you're telling us, you're looking at, making sure that these things would be eliminated and addressed. since then, i have heard a couple more times that certain regions have been doing that again. i would like an update on that train. in this area. tomade changes to that end my understanding, those changes have been adopted. training meets the appropriate standards. if you have instances that you have heard that is not accurate, i would appreciate knowing it but i have not heard of any such instances. i believe that other entities emulated what we have done in terms of assuring the validity of our training materials curry >> they may have hired contractors to do the training. step to be a serious ensure they follow the rules. >> included a review of any contractors utilizing our allrials to assure that live up to our standards. >> i appreciate that. i'm going to go back to mr. serrano beca
just briefly is the challenges posed to, frankly the fbi general counsel's office and its problems that i think are general to other general counsel's in the intelligence community as well as doj. and that is really three particular areas that i'm going to focus on. the jones decision from last year going dark which i will describe for those he don't know what that entails, and the problems with cyber initiatives that are going on. and all those i think are examples of the challenges of new technology when we have old law. i think when i look at this, give you my frame of reference when i'm approaching these. i think of a 19th century as industrial revolution i think the 20 century as modern medicine. i think of the 21st century even though we're only 13 years into it as the age of new technology. and the problem i see is that you have 19th, 18th, 17th century borders. you have nationstates with their individual laws, that you have crime that is transcending all that. and so we are wrestling with how do you do with those anomalies and how do you update the law to kc those tensions
developing story in the art world. the fbi says it is getting closer to solving a $500 million heist that took place 23 years ago in boston. nbc news' justice correspondent pete williams is with us now. the fbi says they are making progress. what does that mean in this case? >> well, the reports come from the fbi itself and say they have made progress. they have never arrested anyone but now know who did the actual theft. they are not arresting them. they are not charging it with them because the statute of limitations has long since run. they are members of an organized crime organization that operates in the mid-atlantic and new england but say they've never been able to figure out whatever happened. now they know, based on some tips, that some of the art was taken to connecticut and some was taken to philadelphia and offered for sale ten years ago. they don't know where it is now. so what is this all about? it's all about two things, tyler. number one, they think that whoever was involved in the organized crime theft of these works, that it includes 13 masterpieces, three rembrand
to know what is going on with this investigation. they have heard nothing from the fbi. bill: school bus driver facing suspension for taking a call on the job. now why would she do that? wait until you hear who was calling before you pass judgment here. >> we have these rules, context doesn't matter. there is some, there are some circumstances here warrant taking another look at this. % every year. go to e-trade and find out how much our advice and guidance costs. spoiler alert: it's low. it's guidance on your terms, not ours. e-trade. less for us. more for you. martha: let's go back to our top story now. this all began to break during "america's newsroom" yesterday. now we're getting conflicting account what's really going on inside syria as the civil war there continues to rage. you've got the white house at first saying it had no reason to believe those reports that were coming out, that chemical weapons had been used. something that president obama had said very clearly, that if it happened that would be a red line. it would be a game-changer, change the calculus were his words. just
meeting. you bet they're talking about that. bill: big brains in that room. did the fbi solve one of america's most infamous art heists? ♪ . bill: so we hear from the fbi it has made a major break in one of the best known art heists in u.s. history. it says it now knows who stole 13 masterpieces from boston's isabella stuart museum 23 years ago this week. the fbi is not releasing the names of the suspects and offering only a few clues it says. >> for the first time we can say with a high degree of confidence we determined in the years since the theft the art was transported to connecticut and to the philadelphia area. bill: well the missing art includes three rembrandts, like storm on the sea of gal little lee. and monet. the masterpieces are worth an estimated $500 million. martha: well, we're learning that a computer glitch is putting the mars rover "curiosity" science experiments on a bit of a hold right now. nasa says it is still in contact with its good friend rover up there and hopes to have it fully functioning this week but it comes after "curiosity" made the most signif
, to natural instincts. jenna: today fbi director bob muller faces some new questions from lawmakers on the status of the investigation of the benghazi terror attacks. this is as more questions are surfacing about why we aren't hearing from the survivors. >> does the white house take a position on whether the various lawmakers who have been seeking access to the benghazi survivors should, in fact, have that access? >> as i said on your air the other day, the white house is certainly not preventing anybody from having access to any of the survivors of the benghazi attack. i think it's worth noting that government employees, in this case some of them in highly-sensitive positions, have responsibilities that existed before and exist after an attack like that. but investigation is ongoing. we don't talk about specifics in terms of the president's visits to walter reed. i can -- >> or elsewhere? >> i don't have anything for you on that. i don't know the answer to that question. jenna: just to clarify, james rosen asked jay carney has the president met with any of the survivors, and that's
overstatement. the f.b.i. said there were fewer than 8600 homicides linked to firearms in 2011. when you look at depth by rifles of which the assault weapons are sub category, the number drops to 323. smaller portion for children. in montana free meal could be as close as the nearest highway. the senate as a road kill bill to stop and pick up elk, deer, antelope and moose that had and lost run-ins with car. not every animal is fair game. earlier version of the bill allowing for collecting raccoon, possum and some birds is caned. it heads to governor's desk for a senator. one told the "associated press" it's a sin to waste good meat. welcome sight for hungry airline passengers monday. order of 60 pizzas delivered to the plane. delta flight from boston to atlanta was diverted to knoxville, tennessee, because of weather. stuck on the tar mac for three hours. airline employee called pizza hut and after a tsa screening the pizzas were delivered to the passengers complete with a police escort. passengers say they appreciated the gesture and despite request, no beer was served with it. >>> unfortuna
, these are hearty people here. are they sick of the winter weather? you bet they are. >> thank you, susan. the fbi joining the search for a missing student. he didn't have his wallet or cell phone and he disappeared. [ male announcer ] this one goes out to all the allergy muddlers. you know who you are. you can part a crowd, without saying a word... if you have yet to master the quiet sneeze... you stash tissues like a squirrel stashes nuts... well muddlers, muddle no more. try zyrtec®. it gives you powerful allergy relief. and zyrtec® is different than claritin® because zyrtec® starts working at hour one on the first day you take it. claritin® doesn't start working until hour three. zyrtec®. love the air. it's lots of things. all waking up. connecting to the global phenomenon we call the internet of everything. ♪ it's going to be amazing. and exciting. and maybe, most remarkably, not that far away. we're going to wake the world up. and watch, with eyes wide, as it gets to work. cisco. tomorrow starts here. weeks since the schoolteacher went missing in new orleans, and there's still no ass
boston. that was march 18, 1991, 23 years ago to the day. the fbi is not naming the culprits. offeri offeri offeri offering liency in the art is returned. >>> mayor bloomberg is saying he wants cigarettes to be hidden out of sight. playing our sad violin wall of greats behind the wall. >> it includes cigars and other tobacco products. what is that chewing tobacco or whatever? why should cigars be banished the way cigarettes are? >> mayor bloomberg might not have anything to do. the soda ban is done. the court system is not clogged up enough. i have no idea why he is doing this. >> do you know bloomberg? >> i think he's fantastic. we tease our mayors. >> call him the nanny. >> let's be serious. mayor bloomberg has done more for public health of new yorkers than most mayors could dream of. >> are you sure of that? >> he got smoking out of restaurants and bars, a guy at the very end of his very last term ever. >> exactly. >> trying to get a few more things through if this is how he feels about it. >> that's the bigger point. he needs to are relevant. let's get more newspapers going. >>
at a virginia facility on high-tech programs that could benefit china's military, and the fbi busted him over the weekend with a one-way ticket on a flight about to take off to beijing. court documents show the worker did not revole all the electronics he was taking with him, including a nasa laptop commuter and a hard drive. congressman wolf says the contractor has a history of trouble. >> we know that mr. james has in the past, has in the past, taken sense stiff information back to china and he should not have been allowed to remove from langley. >> last week the inspector general said this did not appear to be. >> shepard: a huge day for a teenager who took a bullet on the school bus. today she walked back to school for the first time. what she says about her mission next. ds... ♪ wireless is limitless. [ female announcer ] from finding the best way... ♪ to finding the best catch... ♪ wireless is limitless.
is harry wu. how are you going to respond recently fbi arrest in nsa? secondly i want to ask about china human rights issue, you know, -- [inaudible] and china have forced abortion every year. and china -- [inaudible] -- organ transplant a couple thousand a year. number two country of the world. just very large human rights issue. i hope you can talk about the human rights issue, let's more talk about economic trade with china. >> i think that both issues are important. it is important to economically engage china. i think of evolution in terms of human rights is partly dependent upon what we do to put information into china about what's happening on the ground in china in real-time in order to expose these types of abuses. and that is best done through radio free asia. but it is also done to other legislation that we have enacted in which we have an institution year on the hill that -- and i'm a member of the hearings that we hold on this issue, which elevate human rights, and which he gets that information out into the international press. so it's partly getting the information out to
, fbi commute dha, treasury, order patrol agents. these people are hugely dedicated people fighting this fight her to shoulder with us. we have to acknowledge the fact they are not in uniform but these don't wear military uniforms. they do it very, very tough job, but they're overwhelmed us to points out the intricacies and efficiency of this networking, ruthlessness of it. we need to remember the true heroes in every sense of the word. >> these are not only ruthless, all server that lets because the amounts of money are so huge and i agree with you that are civilian non-person in authority, which had a prior point in our history would've been relying on completely to combat networks now has been out and an outmanned in our research research by this criminal networks, so we've relied increasingly on the network you and the men and women into your command have done. i wonder whether you feel either more resources to them for more coordination with you is perhaps an answer to dealing with these networks. >> if i understand the question, i'm a believer in the away game. i go back to th
that come. you have to use a proxy, fbi background check. >> we are not talking about what would really make a difference here. that is not even on the table. >> i think it would make a difference. i think 90% of most gun violence is done with handguns. i think -- i read 2% of the gun homicide are done via assault weapon. if you can stop homicidal man c maniacs from buying a handgun because of the background check -- >> i think they can find another way to get them but it's a start. >> if you talk to mike bloomberg, you talk to other people that have champions of sensible gun regulation, they will tell you will, yes, the assault weapon ban, especially in light of sandy hook, would be a very powerful symbolic victory and i agree. mike bloomberg and others knows if you want to stop the gun violence not just in sandy hook and in chicago and across america your best shot is having mental and criminal background checks. >> i think he also realizes this is a long process. this is an important policy victory at stake. background checks i think 40% of gun sales because of these loopholes don't incl
this country. according to the fbi we saw a record 19 1/2 million background checks for firearms last year. nearly three million of them coming in december alone. that is the most for any month on record. and more than 7 million from december through february. that is a 54% increase from the previous year. this national trend is echoed in the microcosm of newtown, connecticut. where law enforcement say they have seen the pace of applications for gun permits double. so what does this all mean for the gun control debate, an effort going forward? joining me fox news political analyst juan williams. juan, we can talk about the strategy here and move onto the legislation itself. why, why did harry reid make the decision? >> didn't have the votes, jenna lee. it is very clear he does not feel if this can get through and it further could endanger efforts that he is making on the gun control front and central among them would be making sure that you punish people who are straw purchasers of illegal, of weapons in order to hand them over to others who don't have the right to buy guns, couldn't get t
scene. you can seatcan see the fbi, sh office and campus police are still investigating. this entire incident began around midnight with a 911 call regarding a man with a gun. they found a student dead with an apparent self-inflicted gun wound and what they found inside was enough to make sure students got out of the building immediately. inside the dorm, there was a handgun, an assault weapon, an ied found inside a bag in his room. but school officials keeping quiet about the student that committed suicide or what they have learned about why or how he had such dangerous weapons on campus here. now, the university of central florida, the entire campus, the main campus, was shut down. it reopened at noon. we're expecting to get more information later on this afternoon. reporting here in orange county, kelly cook. back to you. >>> and now to some of the hottest stories in a flash. roll it. wobbly day for stocks. blame cyprus of all places. a proposed eu bailout for cyprus includes a tax on bank customer's savings accounts. an idea that sends shivers through the investment community. ri
, justice part, science so we are properly, i think, funding things like the f.b.i., the d.e.a., law enforcement agencies, the commerce and trade divisions, as well as all of the others included in the bill. so, mr. speaker, this is a good bill. i'm proud of it. i'm proud of the fact that we were able to do all of this, frankly, as smoothly as it has gone. that's a tribute to the work of people like nita lowey, the new ranking member on the full committee, and the work of senator richard shelby, ranking republican on the senate side. of course the new chairman of the committee over there, senator barbara mikulski. all of us work together and we were determined to produce a product that would be good for the nation, number one, but as it turns out i think it's good for this body and the senate. we proved when we set our mind to it we can get complicated, hard things done. and that's what this bill does. so, mr. speaker, i urge an aye vote on 933. yield back. the speaker pro tempore: all time for debate has expired. pursuant to the order of the house on wednesday, march 20, 2013, the p
, the costs of the war now estimated to top $5 trillion. then the fbi's top lawyer on how law enforcement investigations are keeping up with new technology without breaking the law. that's followed by a house appropriations subcommittee looking into agriculture department spending. >> let's go straight to a personal topic. you've been on the commission since 2006. the chairman has been on since i believe 2009. his term is a. yours will be up next year. should we expect to see some term over at the commission speak what you should always see turnout because we all have staggered terms. the past six years have flown by very quickly, and we shall see. i get asked this question every couple of years and we've been almost seven years. i multiply thinking about but we shall see. >> thinking about what? >> what to do next. i have thought about that several times, what comes after the commission. a limited government personnel i think it should stay in the positions forever. at the same time i love my job. that's part of what is keeping me here and we have a lot of important work to do. spent thi
Search Results 0 to 21 of about 22 (some duplicates have been removed)

Terms of Use (10 Mar 2001)